Authentication
11 min read

Adaptive Authentication: A Practical Guide

Passwordless-based authentication has a lot of advantages and is the underpinning of any robust cybersecurity program. While it's far more secure than using passwords to access important information, it can be burdensome for employees to learn a new practice.

Authentication
14 min read

API Authentication: An Overview of Securing API Access

API authentication is the process of verifying the identities of users, individual devices, or platforms seeking access to APIs (Application Programming Interface). It acts as a digital guardian, protecting the valuable resources within your APIs and ensuring that only authorized individuals can access them for good.

Authentication
16 min read

Biometric Authentication: Exploring the Various Types

Biometric authentication has fast become one of the most commonly used and accepted methods of authentication. It uses specific characteristics of a person, such as facial features, voice, and fingerprints, to validate one’s identity. In other words, biometric authentication leverages “something you are” rather than “something you know” or “something you own” to validate users.

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Gait Recognition: The Unique Biometric Trait for User Verification

Biometrics is an increasingly popular form of biometric authentication. Instead of using something that a user knows or has to identify them, biometrics uses something unique to them as a person. Many forms of biometric authentication use unique physical features for authentication, such as fingerprints, voices, or iris patterns. Gait recognition is different in that it uses something unique about how a person acts or moves, in this case, their walking gait.

Cyberattack
8 min read

Adware: Malicious Ads and Prevention Methods

Adware, or advertising-supported software, is software designed to deliver ads to users. While these ads can be designed to generate revenue for a developer, the term is frequently used to describe a type of malware that profits an attacker or installs malware on a user’s machine.

Cyberattack
11 min read

ARP Poisoning: Network Manipulation

A computer has a few different addresses associated with it. A computer will have IP addresses associated with the network(s) that it is connected to. It also has a hardware or MAC address assigned to each of its network interface cards (NICs). IP addresses are used to get traffic to the right subnet, and then a switch might use a MAC address to send the data to the correct port and the computer attached to it.

Cyberattack
14 min read

Botnets: Covert Networks and Countermeasures

Botnets are responsible for many large-scale cyber attacks. That includes Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks and spam/phishing campaigns. They're also behind credential-stuffing attacks that then lead to data breaches. In order to implement effective cybersecurity countermeasures against these threats, it’s important to understand what they are. So what are botnets? In a nutshell, they’re clandestine networks of compromised computers. We’ll elaborate on that and other related details in this comprehensive guide.

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Malware
8 min read

Adware: Malicious Ads and Prevention Methods

Adware, or advertising-supported software, is software designed to deliver ads to users. While these ads can be designed to generate revenue for a developer, the term is frequently used to describe a type of malware that profits an attacker or installs malware on a user’s machine.

Malware
14 min read

Botnets: Covert Networks and Countermeasures

Botnets are responsible for many large-scale cyber attacks. That includes Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks and spam/phishing campaigns. They're also behind credential-stuffing attacks that then lead to data breaches. In order to implement effective cybersecurity countermeasures against these threats, it’s important to understand what they are. So what are botnets? In a nutshell, they’re clandestine networks of compromised computers. We’ll elaborate on that and other related details in this comprehensive guide.

Malware
11 min read

Keylogging: Surveillance and Protecting Sensitive Data

Keylogging is a form of surveillance and data theft. It's designed to 1) spy on users when they enter login credentials and 2) steal those credentials. Once the credentials have been obtained, the keylogger, the tool used for this nefarious activity, then transmits the credentials to the threat actor’s system. This system usually comes in the form of a remote command-and-control (C2) server.

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ARP Poisoning: Network Manipulation

A computer has a few different addresses associated with it. A computer will have IP addresses associated with the network(s) that it is connected to. It also has a hardware or MAC address assigned to each of its network interface cards (NICs). IP addresses are used to get traffic to the right subnet, and then a switch might use a MAC address to send the data to the correct port and the computer attached to it.

Session Hijacking: Unauthorized Control

Websites use the concept of sessions to track a user's identity as they browse through the site. Without sessions, a user would have to authenticate to each page of a restricted site, which would negatively impact the user experience. Instead, users are assigned a session ID that can be used to identify future requests in the same session.

SSL Stripping: Downgrading Encryption

In recent years, the Internet has increasingly been moving to use encrypted HTTPS for web browsing. In fact, over 90% of web browsing uses HTTPS instead of insecure HTTP. The reason for this trend is that HTTPS provides greater protection against eavesdropping and authenticates the identity of the website.

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Dictionary Attack: Cracking Passwords with Words

A dictionary attack is a method used by hackers to breach user accounts by systematically entering each word from a compiled list of common words and popular combinations that people often choose as their passwords. Despite advancements in security protocols and ongoing education about creating strong passwords, dictionary attacks remain a potent threat.

Password Spraying: Strengthening Authentication and User Security

While many online services have upped their game in terms of requiring users to create strong passwords, threat actors frequently hack into accounts using password-based attacks. Password spraying is one such attack that stealthily targets a large pool of users with a select set of commonly used passwords. This article delves deep into the world of password spraying by highlighting its mechanics, citing some examples and status that exemplify the threat, and more importantly, showcasing strategies and tools to strengthen your authentication and user security against this attack.

Shoulder Surfing: Stealing Secrets in Plain Sight

In today's digital world, the passwords and codes people use to access accounts and apps are vulnerable in many ways; one of those ways is shoulder surfing in which malicious individuals observe sensitive information being entered or displayed on a system or screen. In contexts ranging from ATMs where PINs unlock a world of financial information to corporate settings where a single password is often the gateway to valuable enterprise data, the risks of shoulder surfing are potentially far-reaching. This article provides a deep dive into what shoulder surfing is, how it works, and how to prevent it.

Phishing Types
14 min read

Business Email Compromise: Detecting and Preventing Email Fraud

Business Email Compromise (BEC) is a sophisticated social engineering attack in which cybercriminals impersonate executives, employees, or business partners by using, compromising, or spoofing their legitimate email accounts. The motive of business email compromise attacks is usually (although not always) financial in nature and generally involves misleading recipients into transferring money.

Phishing Types
10 min read

Clone Phishing: Identifying and Avoiding Duplicate Email Scams

Most people are well aware of the classic phishing scams by now: the Nigerian prince, the lottery they never entered, the estranged relative leaving behind a fortune. Clone phishing, though, is a different beast. By preying on trust and mimicking legitimate emails to an uncanny degree, clone phishing emails dupe even the most vigilant employees.

Smishing: Understanding SMS-based Phishing Threats

SMS phishing or smishing is a social engineering attack that uses SMS to send phishing messages to a user. Often, these messages are designed to induce a user to click on a link that takes them to a phishing site. The growth of smishing attacks has been driven by the growing use of mobile devices. Companies increasingly use text messages for customer service and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) programs normalize mobile device usage in the workplace. As a result, smishing has become a major threat to businesses and individuals alike.

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